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History of Nagoya

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Print2008-04-01

History of Nagoya

History of Nagoya

Year

History

4C~6C

Kofun (burial mound) period

Early 6C

Construction of Atsuta Shrine

1521

Construction of old Nagoya Castle

1584

Battle of Komaki and Nagakute

1607

Arrival of Tokugawa Yoshinao to Owari

1610

Relocation of castle and town from Kiyosu to Nagoya

1612

Completion of donjon at Nagoya Castle

1869

Recall of the feudal domains by the Imperial Government

1871

Establishment of Nagoya Prefecture

1878

Establishment of Nagoya Ward

1880

First Nagoya Ward Council Election

1886

Opening of the Tokaido Line and Nagoya Station

1889

Establishment of municipal government/Installation of first electric lights in the city

1891

Nobi Earthquake

1898

Japan’s second city tram system (privately operated) in Nagoya/Beginning of infra-city telephone system

1910

Beginning of water works construction

1920

Establishment of public housing in the city/First census ― 92,000 households, slightly under 430,000 people

1925

Beginning of radio broadcasts in Nagoya

1929

First City Assembly election based on universal suffrage

1930

Completion of the Great Torii Gate at Nakamura Park, and the Civic Assembly Hall

1932

Opening of the Nakagawa Canal

1933

Construction of the City Hall (current City Hall)

1934

City population exceeds one million

1937

Nagoya Pan-Pacific Peace Exposition/Opening of the Higashiyama Zoo & Botanical Gardens

1941

Pacific War

1942

First air raid on Nagoya

1945

Mikawa Earthquake/Destruction of the Nagoya Castle donjon by fire/End of war/American Occupation Army enters Nagoya

1946

Nagoya Reconstruction Festival

1947

Public Mayoral election

1951

First private radio broadcast

1954

Beginning of television broadcasts in Nagoya/Construction of Nagoya TV Tower

1955

First Nagoya Festival

1956

Nagoya is granted Designated City status

1957

Opening of the underground shopping complex, and subway system

1959

Ise Bay Typhoon/Reconstruction of Nagoya Castle

1969

City population exceeds two million

1972

Beginning of Nagoya Expressway construction

1975

Establishment of the 16 Wards system

1977

Creation of Nagoya City Basic Concepts Plan

1989

World Design Exposition

1999

Emergency Announcement for Garbage Reduction

2000

Official announcement of the Nagoya New Century Plan 2010 / Tokai Flood

2001

Achievement of 200,000-ton waste reduction goal

2002

Opening of Oasis 21

2003

Received the “Grand Prix” and “Environmental Minister’s Award” at 2003 Municipal Government Environmental Grand Prix

2004

Opening of remodeled Tokugawaen

2005

New Century ― Nagoya Castle Exhibition/EXPO 2005 Aichi, Japan

2006

Opening of remodeled Nagoya TV Tower

Nagoya City Archives

Nagoya City Archives

Designated as an “Important National Cultural Asset”, the building currently housing the Nagoya City Archives was once home for the Nagoya City Court of Appeals, the Regional Courthouse, and the Ward Courthouse. Various non-loan materials related to the city government are stored here and can be accessed by the public. In addition, the Archives hold permanent exhibits with such themes as city administration and the legislature system, and provides exhibit and assembly rooms to help residents with their cultural activities.

Nagoya Noh Theater

Nagoya Noh Theater

The stage of this Noh Theater was constructed completely from Six-hundred-year-old Japanese cypress trees from the Kiso region (presently part of Nagano Prefecture), and traditional Japanese architecture is represented throughout the theater. With a seating capacity of 630, it is the largest of the Noh theaters owned by local governments. The theater has beautiful lighting and rich acoustics, as well as an earphone guide system to listen to an explanation while enjoying the performance.

Tokugawaen

Tokugawaen

The origin of this Japanese garden was as the retirement residence for Mitsutomo, the second-generation lord of the Owari Tokugawa clan. In 2004, a new stroll-style landscaped garden centering around an inner pond, reminiscent of daimyo (feudal lord) grounds, was opened within the premises. At the same time the Hosa Library with its collection of old documents and books centering on the former collection of the Owari Tokugawa clan, was also expanded.

The “Cultural Path” and Cultural Path Futaba Museum (The former residence of Kawakami Sadayakko)

Cultural Path Futaba Museum

The area between Nagoya Castle and Tokugawaen, formerly a residential area for warrior families, has been cultivated as a “Cultural Path”, where events are staged and valuable architectural heritages are preserved and utilized. The main attraction of this Cultural Path is the former residence of Kawakami Sadayakko, Japan’s first actress. It has been restored to its original appearance, which incorporated both Japanese and Western architecture, when she lived there during the Taisho period (1912—1926).